Newsletter.1.10

EDUCATION

The Top News Stories about Education, Sports and HBCUs.

Prepare

The growing interest in Historically Black Colleges & Universities fuels an impressive rise in enrollment and campus activities, coupled with  an eagerness to partner with government, corporations and other supporters to continue to prepare every student and athlete with a quality educational experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some articles of interest…

Table of Contents
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HBCU Funding & Grants & Things

North Carolina A&T State University

North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, NC received a $1.5 million grant from the Weaver Foundation to create the H. Michael Weaver Endowment in International Programs at the university. The H. Michael Weaver Endowment will help to meet the funding needs of university students who might not otherwise be able to participate in global experience and education abroad programs.

Spelman College in Atlanta, GA received a $500,000 grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and a $500,000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation for programs aimed at the development of its faculty. Mary Schmidt Campbell, president of Spelman College stated: “Faculty are the heart of a liberal arts education. At historically Black colleges and universities, heavy teaching loads often get in the way of professional development, time for research and/or creative production. Yet, time for these activities not only keeps faculty current in their fields but provides undergraduate research opportunities for our students.”

Grambling State University

New Academic Center for Excellence in Mathematical Achievement
Grambling State University was among nine colleges and universities in the state of Louisiana to open a Center of Excellence that are recognized by the Louisiana Board of Regents. Grambling State is currently the only Center of Excellence that has an academic designation.

Grambling State University

Grambling State University Adds Degree Program in Cloud Computing
Grambling State University in Louisiana received approval from the University of Louisiana System board of supervisors to develop a proposal to offer the state’s first bachelor’s degree in cloud computing.

If all goes as planned, the new major could begin to enroll students as early as next fall.
“Our many professors in technology-related disciplines are continuing our long legacy of educating students on the cutting edge,” said the university’s interim provost, Connie Walton. “From computer science and cybersecurity to this proposed new degree, their work in research and industry are helping grow educational quality and internships for our students. We know Louisiana students are well-positioned to fill today’s market needs,” 
“Grambling State University President Rick Gallot: We, at Grambling State, are grateful for the continued support of our partners in government and industry who help us continue to drive innovation.”

UNCF Funds Liberal Arts Innovation Centers at Four HBCUs

Four Historically Black Colleges and Universities will each receive $300,000 from the United Negro College Fund to create a campus-based or virtual liberal arts innovation center that focuses on merging the technical discipline of STEM, healthcare, education, and finance into the liberal arts. The goal of the program is to enable the HBCUs to expand research, provide training and development opportunities to faculty and staff, and to incubate and test approaches to implementing embedding technical disciplines into the liberal arts.
The HBCUs participating are:
Fayetteville State University Fayetteville, North Carolina, Voorhees College, Denmark, South Carolina, Talladega College, Talledega, Alabama and Dillard University, New Orleans, LA.
“The economic mobility for students who have a base in a liberal arts education is evident. UNCF is eager to cross-pollinate liberal arts pedagogy into professions that will provide the all-encompassing skill sets that 21st-century employers value,” said Dr. Michael L. Lomax, president and CEO of the United Negro College Fund.

Clark Atlanta University

CAU Partners with Augusta University for Cyber Security Research
The departments of cyber-physical systems at Clark Atlanta University and the School of Computer and Cyber Sciences at Augusta University will join forces to promote research on making complex-cyber-physical systems efficient, reliable and secure. The partnership will provide for research opportunities for undergraduate students at each university.

George T. French, president of Clark Atlanta University, stated that the university “is excited about the possibilities of this unique partnership. Together we will drive the diversity of ideas, talents, and opportunities that ensure a successful and more inclusive ecosystem for innovation.”
Augusta University is a state school with nearly 5,500 undergraduate students and about 3,000 graduate students. African Americans make up 24 percent of the undergraduate student body. (U.S. Dept. of Education).

The National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation will award a $3 million grant to six educational institutions in Georgia to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups who graduate with degrees in the STEM fields. Students selected to participate in the program will receive a stipend, mentoring, research and internship opportunities, invitations to research conferences to present their work, and preparation for the Graduate Research Examination.
Note: although no HBCUs were included, perspective applicants who are interested in community colleges and technical colleges are available.
Participating institutions are:
Georgia Southwestern State University
Columbus State University
Valdosta State University
Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College
Columbus Technical College
South Georgia Technical College

Bowie State University

Bowie State University and Baltimore City Community College have formed an alliance that will make it easier for graduates of the community college to transfer to four-year degree programs at the historically Black university.
Baltimore City Community College enrolls about 4,500 students according to the latest data supplied to the U.S. Department of Education. African Americans make up more than two thirds of the student body.

Under the agreement, Baltimore City Community College graduates will be able to transfer into 12 comparable academic programs at Bowie State University to complete their bachelor’s degrees.
Education

Nursing
Psychology
Business Administration
Computer technology… are among the 12 programs included in the agreement.
In addition, a unique feature of the agreement will enable select students in the community college’s Honor’s Program to transfer into the Honor’s Program at Bowie State University and receive a full scholarship covering in-state tuition and fees.
Aminta H. Breaux, president of Bowie State University, stated that “together with Baltimore City Community College, Bowie State University is advancing our Racing to Excellence strategic plan and vision, creating new collaborative educational partnerships.
This partnership will build a meaningful pathway for BCCC students to continue their educational pursuits in innovative academic programs for today’s workforce.”

(Sources: JHBE, US News, NCES, NC A&T University, Spelman College, Grambling State University, Bowie State University)

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HBCU News

NEWS

FUTURE Act Passes House

The U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation Tuesday afternoon that would permanently fund historically black colleges and universities and other minority-serving institutions, as well as simplify the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and eliminate paperwork for income-driven student loan repayment plans.
READ MORE

Why ‘HBCU vs. PWI’ Is Not Always About Choice

Ishmale Powell is a 15-year-old high school graduate whose story has gone viral—not just because of his scholastic achievement and age — but because he has to crowdsource for his post-secondary education despite having a 4.5 grade point average, 1130 SAT score, and 22 ACT score). READ MORE

By the Numbers:

HBCUs have produced 30 Pro Football Hall of Fame members…There are seven NBA  members and 3 coaches in the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame…the National Track & Field Hall has 12 members and seven coaches…only three members have reached the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame; 10- Canadian Football League; Olympics- 20 men and 29 women and counting. READ MORE

Those We Touch

Those We Touch

By Edd J. Hayes

As a designated “hoops dad,” I found myself chauffeuring my teenage daughter and a few of her friends to games and practices. They became like my own and I would constantly be in their heads…talking basketball and the importance of making good grades, and the value of looking forward to going to college.
(It was amazing to watch my daughter who went from a dainty little girl to someone who idolized Charles Oakley and tried to imitate his rugged domination around the rim.  She played on a Truman High School team that went 16-2 in her senior year and even made the City playoffs, but was no match for the bigger and more talented teams around the city).
Only one of them- the “big” center (she was only 5-10) had any real potential to garner a scholarship at the next level, so I felt it was important to encourage them to be academically prepared to get into a school. It may have seemed my rants went right over their heads.

In the end, a number of them did make the transition to the next level with the help of their parents and guidance counselors.
There was one girl who I would drop off after practice, who was a really decent player I thought, but seemed quite distant and not focused. But, I kept encouraging her, trying to draw her out but it didn’t seem to register. Little did I know (until my daughter shared her dilemma with me) how unstable things were for her at home. It seems she had been abandoned by her mother and was being cared for by her elderly grandmother, who had meager resources and little knowledge about helping her to carve out a career path for herself. 

“I firmly believe that investing in someone else’s child and expecting nothing in return is just as rewarding as taking care of
your own”

After graduation, my daughter went on to Hampton University and we lost contact with the young lady.  A few years later, after graduation, my daughter came home for the Christmas holidays and told me her old classmate had contacted her on FaceBook. She asked how I was doing and told her to “thank me.”
Curiously, I asked why she was thanking me. She revealed that I had inspired her to attend college and now she was in dental school!
I couldn’t have felt more proud at that moment if she was one of my own.
In fact, she was one of my own! I know now what it means to be a part of a village. My only regret was I reach out to more of them to make the transition.
And… maybe I did.
This is the passion we all can share if we realize the value of trying to make a difference to those who may not have the support and resources to help them achieve their potential.
I firmly believe that investing in someone else’s child and expecting nothing in return is just as rewarding taking care of your own. They deserve the chance and can use our help to prepare for live itself. There are hundreds of men and women who spend their time in gyms and centers who can testify to that.
Black colleges need our help too! In these times of limited resources and other challenges, we need to stand firm in our support of HBCUs!
In the spirit of giving, we can bind together to help solidify the future for others and perhaps put them in the best position to succeed.

What’s your opinion?

“I firmly believe that investing in someone else’s child and expecting nothing in return is just as rewarding as taking care of
your own”

The Homecoming

The Homecoming

By Edd J. Hayes

During the 1970s-80s, a growing enthusiasm surrounding Black College sports – particularly football, men and women basketball, track and field (men and women) – was riding a renewed popularity, thanks to publications like the Pittsburgh Courier, Sheridan Sports, and newcomers Black College Sports Reports and Black Sports World magazine.
Black college football was producing superstars like Walter Payton (Jackson State), Harry Carson (SC State), Jerry Rice (Mississippi Valley) and John Taylor (Delaware State)…NFL Super Bowl champions and Hall of Fame candidates (just a short list).
A group of mentors from my church formed a football excursion to several games to expose our youths to the college sports atmosphere. Most of them were kids who possibly had never traveled outside of the city limits of New York City.
Since I was engaged in Black College Sports, I coordinated a Saturday trip to a Delaware State Homecoming game. I had covered a few games on campus and was impressed by the tailgate turnout and the genuine support of fans and alumni. The homecoming weekend was even more exceptional and I was elated that we could share this experience with the kids.
I recall that chilly Saturday morning as the travelers begin to assemble and the anticipation of the wide eyed children who were escaping their neighborhood, if just for a day. But there was one teenager, about 15 years old, who got on the bus in a haughty mood. He brushed his way past everyone and sprawled on the backseat, not willing to share the space with anyone. I kept an eye on him out of curiosity because I hadn’t recalled ever seeing him attend a church service. 

“Our greatest reward is contributing to the good of all and it rings of success for all.”

On the two hour trip to Dover, he remained isolated and uncommunicative. However, when then bus pulled into the parking lot, everyone was drawn to the large crowd milling about the lot. There were numerous tailgate parties going on…barbecues, music and just plain joviality.
As they piled out of the bus, I lost sight of the young man. Preoccupied with the game, I was in the press box most of the time and didn’t get to mingle much until halftime.
Even after the game resumed, there was still plenty of activity in the tailgate section and a lot of the kids were involved in pickup basketball games on the courts.
I found myself at the edge of the courts when I spotted the teenager. As I observed him, I was totally amused at what I saw. His demeanor had totally changed…he was immersed in a heated contest with other players and hardly noticed me when I approached him.
What happened next was one of those moments. When he made eye contact with me, he came over and said, “ Mr. Hayes! I’m glad I came! This is so much fun!
In fact, when the game was over and we were trying to collect our crew, we had to go looking for him. He was so pumped. He wasn’t ready to leave!
I didn’t see him for a couple of weeks. Then, one Sunday he came to church, with his younger brother in tow. He made his way to me and we engaged in a conversation that gave me so much humility. He thanked me so heartily and said he wanted to finish school and go back to that college. In fact, he said he was strongly admonishing his little brother to “straighten up” and get his grades up.
It may seem like a small thing to those who have never experienced the lifestyle these young people had and don’t feel compelled to get involved with mentoring.
If we recognize our real purpose in life is to help those who are in need…whatever the necessities are, our greatest reward is contributing to the good of all and it rings of success for all. We may be shaping the next president of the United States of America.

A Time Line

A Time Line

By Edd J. Hayes

In 1947, Dr. Mordecai W. Johnson, president of Howard University, stood before a House Labor Department Federal Appropriations subcommittee and extolled the fact that 17 Land-Grant Colleges were being underfunded with small allotments which were crippling the predominately black colleges and universities in their efforts to grow and prepare graduates for professional roles in the Southern states.
He further stated that “the inadequacy of educational opportunity afforded by State-supported schools in 17 Southern States which maintained separate land grant colleges for white and colored students, was a national scandal and this inadequacy is due directly to the inequitable distribution of both Federal and State funds.”
Dr. Johnson told the group (headed by Frank B. Keefe of Wisconsin), that “Howard University is the only colored institution with a first class law school and the only one that offers opportunity comparable to first class State universities like Wisconsin’s or North Carolina’s.”
He revealed that although colored institutions served 10,000 students at the time, they received less than $5,000,000.00 – less than the budget of the University of Louisiana (now Louisiana State University) alone.
In addition, practically all of the colored institutions had to concentrate on undergraduate education, teacher training and agriculture because they could not seriously offer or give education on the graduate level.
(Baltimore Afro-American, 1947)

In 2011, Dr. Charlie Nelms (past president, North Carolina Central University) published “A Call to Action”, a policy directive intended to spur a national dialogue concerning the revitalization of the historically black colleges and universities as an important sector of American higher education.

Ironically, the same issues that were addressed 67 years ago are still prevalent today.

What is different these days are the apathetic views taken by some African Americans questioning the value of supporting these Black colleges and universities. From noted authors to administrators to avid supporters, there is a real concern that unless we can fire up enough dialogue and support in the Black communities, some of our HBCUs are headed for extinction.

Again, the valid question is…why are some of us so dogmatic about devaluing the educational foundations (Black colleges) that our ancestors established to bridge the gap in a society that would not wholeheartedly embrace the very principles that the constitution was based on – “freedom and equality” for everyone?

 

It is critical that all persons in leadership must have a fundamental appreciation and respect for our history

In a speech by Dr. Frederick Humphries, Florida A&M’s past president, on FAMU’s present dilemma (and it speaks to ALL of HBCUs):
    “It is critical that all persons in leadership must have a fundamental appreciation and respect for our history… the special role that FAMU plays and the unique dynamics that it must navigate to be successful in a landscape that does not want FAMU to succeed and is actively seeking to starve the University to death. 
One cannot adopt a model that is successful at a PWI (Predominately White Institution) and just drop that model into FAMU and expect it to work without SIGNIFICANT amounts of nuance and finesse.
Any notion of – “I’m from a PWI, I get it”- , the current and former University community doesn’t is arrogant, inherently naïve and will fail; the stakes are too high to not be thoughtful in every action that FAMU administrators/employees take. As a community we must make our views about decisions at FAMU visible but respectfully – the world is watching and we must consistently demonstrate that we are serious, thoughtful and deliberate in everything that we do. The Alumni must support these Universities that provided them with tools to be successful in life.”

This past summer, Dr. William Harvey, Hampton University’s president who serves as chairperson on President Obama’s Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, called out the Feds for drastically reducing financial support for HBCUs during the event.

He later stated that we must nevertheless pick up the mantle in this crusade to awaken the people to engage in reinforcing the guidelines for bringing back support of our HBCUs:

 “I believe in the relevancy of HBCUs, but believing in them doesn’t mean that we are all alike. Out of 105 HBCUs, they are not all monolithic. There are some that are doing very well, some that are doing poorly, and most of them are somewhere in the middle. It’s the same for predominantly white colleges.
I don’t want to opine on what other HBCUs could or should do, because I only know what’s best for Hampton and what works for Hampton.
A lot of presidents, black and white, when they are newly elected, will ask to come and spend a day with me. I talk with them very frankly about leadership, and the things that have worked for Hampton over my years as president. 
I think it’s up to every HBCU president to best determine what will work or what their vision is for that institution, and then (work) to make it happen.
If you look at institutions that are in trouble or have failed, it’s because they haven’t been able to bring in the resources. It takes money to build a university, and not just money, but an understanding that there are two sides to a ledger. You can’t  just spend aimlessly. No matter what his or her background is, the president must have an understanding of finances and budgeting.”
A president must have an understanding of securing resources, to retain quality faculty support and for infrastructure and scholarships to students. In order to do that, you’ve got to bring in resources, no matter if you’re a private or public institution.”

This is not a declaration about leadership alone. Alumni supporters are very much instrumental in this mix and without them, it amounts to more futility for the future growth, student enrollment and all other extracurricular activities.
It raises a question about the consciousness of those who have made a significant impact on society as a whole…the successful businessman, entertainers, athletes and recipients of good fortune due to their affiliation with and from HBCUs. Outside philanthropies are prevalent also, as they show their generosity toward these schools.
Hopefully, we can rally around this cause and divert the attention away from the naysayers who have no investment in the future of thousands of students, teachers and athletes who want to attend a Historically Black College or University.

We know you have an opinion…weigh in…be a part of the groundswell of supporters!

In a speech by Dr. Frederick Humphries, Florida A&M’s past president, on FAMU’s present dilemma (and it speaks to ALL of HBCUs):
    “It is critical that all persons in leadership must have a fundamental appreciation and respect for our history… the special role that FAMU plays and the unique dynamics that it must navigate to be successful in a landscape that does not want FAMU to succeed and is actively seeking to starve the University to death. 
One cannot adopt a model that is successful at a PWI (Predominately White Institution) and just drop that model into FAMU and expect it to work without SIGNIFICANT amounts of nuance and finesse.
Any notion of – “I’m from a PWI, I get it”- , the current and former University community doesn’t is arrogant, inherently naïve and will fail; the stakes are too high to not be thoughtful in every action that FAMU administrators/employees take. As a community we must make our views about decisions at FAMU visible but respectfully – the world is watching and we must consistently demonstrate that we are serious, thoughtful and deliberate in everything that we do. The Alumni must support these Universities that provided them with tools to be successful in life.”

This past summer, Dr. William Harvey, Hampton University’s president who serves as chairperson on President Obama’s Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, called out the Feds for drastically reducing financial support for HBCUs during the event.

He later stated that we must nevertheless pick up the mantle in this crusade to awaken the people to engage in reinforcing the guidelines for bringing back support of our HBCUs:

 “I believe in the relevancy of HBCUs, but believing in them doesn’t mean that we are all alike. Out of 105 HBCUs, they are not all monolithic. There are some that are doing very well, some that are doing poorly, and most of them are somewhere in the middle. It’s the same for predominantly white colleges.
I don’t want to opine on what other HBCUs could or should do, because I only know what’s best for Hampton and what works for Hampton.
A lot of presidents, black and white, when they are newly elected, will ask to come and spend a day with me. I talk with them very frankly about leadership, and the things that have worked for Hampton over my years as president. 
I think it’s up to every HBCU president to best determine what will work or what their vision is for that institution, and then (work) to make it happen.
If you look at institutions that are in trouble or have failed, it’s because they haven’t been able to bring in the resources. It takes money to build a university, and not just money, but an understanding that there are two sides to a ledger. You can’t  just spend aimlessly. No matter what his or her background is, the president must have an understanding of finances and budgeting.”
A president must have an understanding of securing resources, to retain quality faculty support and for infrastructure and scholarships to students. In order to do that, you’ve got to bring in resources, no matter if you’re a private or public institution.”

This is not a declaration about leadership alone. Alumni supporters are very much instrumental in this mix and without them, it amounts to more futility for the future growth, student enrollment and all other extracurricular activities.
It raises a question about the consciousness of those who have made a significant impact on society as a whole…the successful businessman, entertainers, athletes and recipients of good fortune due to their affiliation with and from HBCUs. Outside philanthropies are prevalent also, as they show their generosity toward these schools.
Hopefully, we can rally around this cause and divert the attention away from the naysayers who have no investment in the future of thousands of students, teachers and athletes who want to attend a Historically Black College or University.

We know you have an opinion…weigh in…be a part of the groundswell of supporters!

In a speech by Dr. Frederick Humphries, Florida A&M’s past president, on FAMU’s present dilemma (and it speaks to ALL of HBCUs):
    “It is critical that all persons in leadership must have a fundamental appreciation and respect for our history… the special role that FAMU plays and the unique dynamics that it must navigate to be successful in a landscape that does not want FAMU to succeed and is actively seeking to starve the University to death. 
One cannot adopt a model that is successful at a PWI (Predominately White Institution) and just drop that model into FAMU and expect it to work without SIGNIFICANT amounts of nuance and finesse.
Any notion of – “I’m from a PWI, I get it”- , the current and former University community doesn’t is arrogant, inherently naïve and will fail; the stakes are too high to not be thoughtful in every action that FAMU administrators/employees take. As a community we must make our views about decisions at FAMU visible but respectfully – the world is watching and we must consistently demonstrate that we are serious, thoughtful and deliberate in everything that we do. The Alumni must support these Universities that provided them with tools to be successful in life.”

This past summer, Dr. William Harvey, Hampton University’s president who serves as chairperson on President Obama’s Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, called out the Feds for drastically reducing financial support for HBCUs during the event.

He later stated that we must nevertheless pick up the mantle in this crusade to awaken the people to engage in reinforcing the guidelines for bringing back support of our HBCUs:

 “I believe in the relevancy of HBCUs, but believing in them doesn’t mean that we are all alike. Out of 105 HBCUs, they are not all monolithic. There are some that are doing very well, some that are doing poorly, and most of them are somewhere in the middle. It’s the same for predominantly white colleges.
I don’t want to opine on what other HBCUs could or should do, because I only know what’s best for Hampton and what works for Hampton.
A lot of presidents, black and white, when they are newly elected, will ask to come and spend a day with me. I talk with them very frankly about leadership, and the things that have worked for Hampton over my years as president. 
I think it’s up to every HBCU president to best determine what will work or what their vision is for that institution, and then (work) to make it happen.
If you look at institutions that are in trouble or have failed, it’s because they haven’t been able to bring in the resources. It takes money to build a university, and not just money, but an understanding that there are two sides to a ledger. You can’t  just spend aimlessly. No matter what his or her background is, the president must have an understanding of finances and budgeting.”
A president must have an understanding of securing resources, to retain quality faculty support and for infrastructure and scholarships to students. In order to do that, you’ve got to bring in resources, no matter if you’re a private or public institution.”

This is not a declaration about leadership alone. Alumni supporters are very much instrumental in this mix and without them, it amounts to more futility for the future growth, student enrollment and all other extracurricular activities.
It raises a question about the consciousness of those who have made a significant impact on society as a whole…the successful businessman, entertainers, athletes and recipients of good fortune due to their affiliation with and from HBCUs. Outside philanthropies are prevalent also, as they show their generosity toward these schools.
Hopefully, we can rally around this cause and divert the attention away from the naysayers who have no investment in the future of thousands of students, teachers and athletes who want to attend a Historically Black College or University.

We know you have an opinion…weigh in…be a part of the groundswell of supporters!

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A Time Line

In 1947, Dr. Mordecai W. Johnson, president of Howard University, stood before a House Labor Department Federal Appropriations subcommittee and extolled the fact that 17 Land-Grant Colleges were being underfunded with small allotments which were crippling the predominately black colleges and universities in their efforts to grow and prepare graduates for professional roles in the Southern states.
He further stated that “the inadequacy of educational opportunity afforded by State-supported schools in 17 Southern States which maintained separate land grant colleges for white and colored students, was a national scandal and this inadequacy is due directly to the inequitable distribution of both Federal and State funds.”
Dr. Johnson told the group (headed by Frank B. Keefe of Wisconsin), that “Howard University is the only colored institution with a first class law school and the only one that offers opportunity comparable to first class State universities like Wisconsin’s or North Carolina’s.”
He revealed that although colored institutions served 10,000 students at the time, they received less than $5,000,000.00 – less than the budget of the University of Louisiana (now Louisiana State University) alone.
In addition, practically all of the colored institutions had to concentrate on undergraduate education, teacher training and agriculture because they could not seriously offer or give education on the graduate level.
(Baltimore Afro-American, 1947)

In 2011, Dr. Charlie Nelms (past president, North Carolina Central University) published “A Call to Action”, a policy directive intended to spur a national dialogue concerning the revitalization of the historically black colleges and universities as an important sector of American higher education.

Ironically, the same issues that were addressed 67 years ago are still prevalent today.

What is different these days are the apathetic views taken by some African Americans questioning the value of supporting these Black colleges and universities. From noted authors to administrators to avid supporters, there is a real concern that unless we can fire up enough dialogue and support in the Black communities, some of our HBCUs are headed for extinction.

Again, the valid question is…why are some of us so dogmatic about devaluing the educational foundations (Black colleges) that our ancestors established to bridge the gap in a society that would not wholeheartedly embrace the very principles that the constitution was based on – “freedom and equality” for everyone?

In a speech by Dr. Frederick Humphries, Florida A&M’s past president, on FAMU’s present dilemma (and it speaks to ALL of HBCUs):
    “It is critical that all persons in leadership must have a fundamental appreciation and respect for our history… the special role that FAMU plays and the unique dynamics that it must navigate to be successful in a landscape that does not want FAMU to succeed and is actively seeking to starve the University to death.
One cannot adopt a model that is successful at a PWI (Predominately White Institution) and just drop that model into FAMU and expect it to work without SIGNIFICANT amounts of nuance and finesse.
Any notion of – “I’m from a PWI, I get it”- , the current and former University community doesn’t is arrogant, inherently naïve and will fail; the stakes are too high to not be thoughtful in every action that FAMU administrators/employees take. As a community we must make our views about decisions at FAMU visible but respectfully – the world is watching and we must consistently demonstrate that we are serious, thoughtful and deliberate in everything that we do. The Alumni must support these Universities that provided them with tools to be successful in life.”

This past summer, Dr. William Harvey, Hampton University’s president who serves as chairperson on President Obama’s Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, called out the Feds for drastically reducing financial support for HBCUs during the event.

He later stated that we must nevertheless pick up the mantle in this crusade to awaken the people to engage in reinforcing the guidelines for bringing back support of our HBCUs:

 “I believe in the relevancy of HBCUs, but believing in them doesn’t mean that we are all alike. Out of 105 HBCUs, they are not all monolithic. There are some that are doing very well, some that are doing poorly, and most of them are somewhere in the middle. It’s the same for predominantly white colleges.
I don’t want to opine on what other HBCUs could or should do, because I only know what’s best for Hampton and what works for Hampton.
A lot of presidents, black and white, when they are newly elected, will ask to come and spend a day with me. I talk with them very frankly about leadership, and the things that have worked for Hampton over my years as president.
I think it’s up to every HBCU president to best determine what will work or what their vision is for that institution, and then (work) to make it happen.
If you look at institutions that are in trouble or have failed, it’s because they haven’t been able to bring in the resources. It takes money to build a university, and not just money, but an understanding that there are two sides to a ledger. You can’t  just spend aimlessly. No matter what his or her background is, the president must have an understanding of finances and budgeting.”
A president must have an understanding of securing resources, to retain quality faculty support and for infrastructure and scholarships to students. In order to do that, you’ve got to bring in resources, no matter if you’re a private or public institution.”

This is not a declaration about leadership alone. Alumni supporters are very much instrumental in this mix and without them, it amounts to more futility for the future growth, student enrollment and all other extracurricular activities.
It raises a question about the consciousness of those who have made a significant impact on society as a whole…the successful businessman, entertainers, athletes and recipients of good fortune due to their affiliation with and from HBCUs. Outside philanthropies are prevalent also, as they show their generosity toward these schools.
Hopefully, we can rally around this cause and divert the attention away from the naysayers who have no investment in the future of thousands of students, teachers and athletes who want to attend a Historically Black College or University.

We know you have an opinion…weigh in…be a part of the groundswell of supporters!

Changing the Landscape

Changing the Landscape​

By Edd J. Hayes

Brief History of Former Black College Stars who were snubbed by PWIs

I attended my first National Basketball Association Media Day in the 1984 and as a “rookie” sports writer, I was awed by the big time press pundits in attendance. I took a seat near the rear of the room and soaked in the atmosphere.
It was one of the first highlights of my young fledgling career.
While everyone was commenting on the upcoming season, the top newcomers and other business, I was anxious to ask the question, “Why weren’t Black college players being talked about in the same breath as everyone else?”

There was Larry Smith, Alcorn State, (taken in the 2nd round, no. 224, Golden State Warriors) and the CIAA Player of the Year Rick Mahorn (Hampton, 2nd round, no. 35, Washington Bullets) who went on to have better careers than 19 of the first and second round picks taken before them. Both player won championship rings in their careers.
I didn’t ask, but I did my homework. There was a lack of interest in scouting these programs because the rhetoric was – there was not a dearth of talent warranting the expense of covering them. This might not be the right vernacular but the point is, the talent drain after integration nearly crippled many Historically Black Colleges and Universities programs.
Even though the 1950-60s produced Hall of Famers like Earl Lloyd, West Virginia State; Dick Barnett, Tennessee State; Willis Reed, Grambling State and Earl Monroe, Winston-Salem State, there was evidence that many other players who broke the glass ceiling were major contributors and championship caliber performers but were not “draft worthy.”  But, there  were many more free agents who had to climb the ladder of professional respectability.

…Which brings us to football.

Four of the greatest players in the Pro Football Hall of Fame are among the Black college elite who raised the performance bar alongside Jim Brown (Syracuse), Bo Jackson (Auburn) and Ernie Davis (Syracuse) and others.

Whether running back, wide receiver or defensive stalwart, at one time in their pro career, they led in the most important categories at their position. One thing they all shared in common: they were certainly top college prospects worthy of a big time scholarship at a predominately white institution.

Let’s take a look at this select group:

Walter Payton, Jackson State University (1971-75) (SWAC)  
One of Mississippi’s best high school running backs, he received no invitations from Southeastern Conference (SEC) schools like Ole Miss, Alabama or Auburn. So, Payton attended Jackson State and played alongside future pro players: Jerome BarkumRobert Brazile, and Jackie Slater (another Hall of Fame member). Payton set college football records in rushing – more than 3,500 yards and averaged 6.1 yards per carry and broke the NCAA rushing scoring record with 65 touchdowns.
He made the All-American Team First Team in 1973 and was Black College Player of the Year in 1974. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Communications in 1975.
He was the first round pick (no. 4) by the Chicago Bears and became one of the most prolific running backs in the history of the National Football League. Payton was a nine-time Pro Bowler and once held the league’s record for most career rushing yards, most touchdowns, most carries, most yards from scrimmage, and all-purpose yards.
He threw eight career touchdown passes (an NFL record for non-quarterbacks) No. 2 (Frank Gifford, NY Giants); was a 2-time NFL Most Valuable Player (1977, 1985) and Bert Bell Award (1985); NFC Player of the Year (1985), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1977), Super Bowl champion (XX), Pro Football Hall of Fame, 1993, NFL 1970s All-Decade Team, NFL 1980s All-Decade TeamNFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team. The Walter Payton Award named in his honor.

Bob Hayes, Florida A&M University (1961-65) (SIAC)
A record setting dual threat in two sports, Hayes was a two-sport stand-out in college in both track and football at Florida A&M University. Though a highly recruited athlete in the state of Florida, he accepted a football scholarship from Florida A&M University to play for legendary head coach Alonza “Jake” Gaither. He ended up excelling in track & field and never lost a race in the 100 yard or 100 meter competitions, but mainstream schools of the area still did not invite him to their sanctioned meets.
Considered the world’s fastest man after setting multiple world records in the 60-yard, 100-yard, 220-yard, and Olympic 100-meter dashes, he  is the only athlete to win both an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl ring

In 1963, he broke the 100-yard dash record with a time of 9.1, a mark that would stand for eleven years and set the world best for 200 meters (20.5 seconds). He was selected to the US Olympic Team in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and set the world record in the 100M and the 4X100M Relay team to a world record 39.0 secs.
College honors: 3-time AAU 100 yard dash champion, 1962–1964
NCAA champion, 200 meter dash, 1964; Florida A&M University Sports Hall of Fame, inaugural class, 1976; Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Hall of Fame, 1996, Black College Football Hall of Fame, 2011

NFL Career

Although Hayes was an outstanding wide receiver on FAMU’s vaunted offenses on the ‘60s, he was not a high draft choice – taken in the seventh round (88th pick) of the NFL Draft by the Dallas Cowboys and the 105 Pick (14th Round) in the AFL Draft. Hayes went on to have a spectacular career and is credited with altering the way defensive secondaries played the game with his speed and athletic ability.
NFL Career Highlights: 3-time Pro Bowl (19651967); 2-time First-team All-Pro (19661968); Second-team All-Pro (1967); 2-time NFL receiving touchdowns leader (1965, 1966); Super Bowl champion (VI).
Receptions: 371, 7417 Yards, 71 Tds. Inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor and Pro Football Hall of Fame

Jerry Rice, Mississippi Valley State University (1981-84) (SWAC) 
Rice shattered just about every NCAA receiving records including a record-setting 1983 season with 102 receptions and 1,450receiving yards. 

College honors:
First Team Division I-AA All-America; single-game NCAA record with 24 passes (vs. Southern University); broke his own Division I-AA records for receptions (112) and receiving yards (1,845),27 touchdown receptions in 1984; Named to every All-American team; finished ninth in Heisman Trophy balloting in 1984. Was MVP in the Blue Gray Classic All-Star Game; inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, 2006. 

NFL Career statistics
Considered the greatest wide receiver in NFL history
Played 20 seasons in the National Football League
All-time leader in most major statistical categories for wide receivers:
Holds over 100 NFL records, the most of any player; 1,549 receptions, career, 22,895 receiving yards, career, 197 receiving touchdowns, career, 23,546 all-purpose yards, careerNFL Most Valuable Player; 2-time NFL Offensive Player of the YearNFC Player of the YearBert Bell Award, 2-time NFC Offensive Player of the YearNFC Rookie of the Year (1985); 6-time NFL receiving yards leader, 6-time NFL receiving touchdowns leaderNFL 75th Anniversary All-Time TeamNFL 1980s-90s All-Decade Team, 13 Pro Bowls, 12-time All-Pro (20 NFL seasons); Three-time Super Bowl championThe Top 100 NFL’s Greatest Players; College Football Hall of Fame, Pro Football Hall of Fame

Michael Strahan Texas Southern University (1990-93) (SWAC) 
Michael Strahan played one season of football and was relatively unknown in scouting circles. He accepted a scholarship offer to play at Texas Southern University where he became one of the most dominant defensive ends in college football. It earned him All-America First Team by: The Poor Man’s Guide to the NFL Draft, The Sheridan Network, Edd Hayes Black College Sports Report and
Associated Press. He was a 2nd Round/ 40th pick in the 1993 NFL Draft by the New York Giants and had a spectacular career as one of the leading sackers of all-time.

Career NFL statistics: 
854 Tackles, 4 Interceptions, 24 Forced fumbles…NFL record 22.5 sacks in a season. Set a career record for the most sacks with 141.5.

NFL honors: 
7-time Pro Bowl ; 4-time First-team All-Pro, 2-time Second-team All-Pro, 2-time NFL sacks leader, 2-time NFC Defensive Player of the YearNFL Defensive Player of the YearNFL 2000s All-Decade TeamNew York Giants Ring of HonorSuper Bowl champion (XLII) 2007

Then, there’s not enough room here to tell you about the super men and women who tore up the tracks in the AAU, NCAA and Olympics…that’s another story.
To be continued.